Difference Between GBIC and SFP & Application

GBIC (Gigabit Interface Converter) is a hot-swappable Gigabit Interface optical module with SC connector. A gigabit interface converter (GBIC) is a standard for transceivers, commonly used with Gigabit Ethernet and fiber channel. A variation of the GBIC called the small form-factor pluggable transceiver (SFP),also known as mini-GBIC, has the same functionality but in a smaller form factor. When it’s best to use GBIC and When to use SFP? What’s the specific difference between GBIC and SFP? This article will talk about it.

 

GBIC vs SFP

 

  1. GBIC is larger than SFP: “GBIC” stands for “Gigabit Interface Converter” and was quite popular in the 1990s. It served as a standard way of connecting to different media like copper and fiber optic cables. In contrast, “SFP” stands for “Small Form-Factor Pluggable,” which also serves the very same purpose as GBIC. The main difference between GBIC and SFP is their size. SFP is considerably smaller than GBIC. It is half the volume of GBIC and can be configured double number of ports on the same panel. Other basic functions is the almost the same with the GBIC.

 

  1. SFP is in prominent use while GBIC is already obsolete: The difference in size is very desirable for many people, especially for those who deal with lots of them, because it will take up a lot less space. Considering that space in a server location is quite limited, using SFP lets you put more within one rack unit than if you used GBIC. Because of this single difference, SFP rapidly gained popularity with administrators who want to maximize their space. As SFP became more popular, GBIC also fell out of favor. Nowadays, GBIC is considered to be obsolete, and you would be hard pressed to find vendors that still carry equipment that is compatible with GBIC. SFP is still widely being used nowadays but is also under pressure from newer standards like SFP+.

 

  1. GBIC and SFP are equal in performance: Although they are different in some aspects , the GBIC and SFP are equal in performance. Both of them are used for Hot swappable to maximize uptime and simplify serviceability, Flexibility of media and interface choice on a port-by-port basis, so you can “pay as you populate” ,Robust design for enhanced reliability and supports digital optical monitoring (DOM) capability.

 

 

Some Modules of GBIC and SFP

 

  1. 1G GBIC

Gigalight GIBC (Gigabit Interface Converter) is a hot-swappable input/output device that plugs into a Gigabit Ethernet port or slot, linking the port with the network. It consists of two sections: The transmitter section incorporates a DFB laser, and the receiver section consists of a PIN photodiode integrated with a trans-impedance preamplifier (TIA). All odules satisfy class I laser safety requirements.

Difference Between GBIC and SFP & Application 1

 

  1. BIDI SFP

Gigalight BIDI SFP is for Single-Fiber Bidirectional Applications. Up to 2.67Gb/s, Distance up to 120 km. The transceiver consists of three sections: a DFB laser transmitter, a PIN photodiode integrated with a trans-impedance preamplifier (TIA) and MCU control unit. All modules satisfy class I laser safety requirements. The transceivers are compatible with SFP Multi-Source Agreement (MSA) and SFF-8472.

Difference Between GBIC and SFP & Application 3

  1. CWDM SFP

Gigalight CWDM SFP is compliant with ITU-T G.694.2. 18-Wavelength is avaiable. Up to 4Gb/s, Distance up to 80 km. The transceiver consists of three sections: a DFB laser transmitter, a APD photodiode integrated with a trans-impedance preamplifier (TIA) and MCU control unit. All modules satisfy class I laser safety requirements.

Difference Between GBIC and SFP & Application 5

 

In summary, GBIC is larger than SFP. SFP is in prominent use while GBIC is already obsolete. GBIC and SFP are equal in performance.

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